No tickets? Blame U2 management, says promoter

Who’s to blame for the U2 fan club presale debacle? A Clearchannel representative points the finger squarely at U2’s management.

U2log.com has learned some interesting information from a Clearchannel representative who has been employed by the company for more than 15 years. This rep, whose job duties include reserving tickets for bands’ use, tells us that the quantity and location of the tickets held by bands for their personal use (i.e., for band guests, promotions, and fan clubs) are always approved in advance in writing by the band’s management. A seating map of each venue, indicating the precise location of band-reserved tickets, is sent to the band’s management to sign off on before remaining tickets are sold to the public.

In U2’s case, the Clearchannel rep believes that band management apparently reserved and approved tickets for ETS’ and American Express’ use, but failed to account for the fan club properly. She suggests that band management either did not pay attention to the number and location of the tickets reserved for the fan club presale as indicated on the venue seating maps sent for approval, purposely chose the worst and fewest number of tickets possible for the fan club presale, or forgot to reserve tickets for the fan club presale.


According to the Clearchannel rep, most bands have the power to acquire as many tickets for their own use as they want. In her experience, she has not seen the Ticketmaster rule that states no more than 8% of the venue may be sold during a presale enforced. She provided the example of the Dave Matthews Band reserving thousands of tickets for its fan club use without any challenge. If U2 wanted to reserve a good number of general admission and reserved tickets for the fan club presale, they definitely could have. (Note: Even at 8% maximum, a 17,000 seat arena would mean 1,360 band-reserved tickets, or 680 pairs. Even after backing out a couple hundred tickets for ETS and American Express, clearly far less than 1,000 tickets were sold to fan club members per show.)

Compounding the problem has been the theft of tickets by brokers. The Clearchannel rep explained that anyone who has access to a Ticketmaster computer terminal in an arena box office, a promoter’s box office, or ticket outlet can potentially break into the system and print tickets before public sales begin. Band-reserved tickets, however, are not in the system to steal, so brokers cannot access those tickets.

A report on Ticketmaster by New York State Attorney General Elliot Spitzer describes in detail how common it is for brokers to pay bribes to people who have access to ticket terminals. Bribery is how brokers were able to obtain and then publish images of actual tickets to U2 shows that have not yet been printed at eBay and other online auction web sites. The Clearchannel rep said theft of tickets by brokers is precisely why virtually every touring act today requests a set-aside for fan club use — to alleviate some of the scalping pressure on the most loyal fans.

The extraordinarily high number of tickets currently being offered by brokers is evidence that U2 management did indeed neglect to reserve an appropriate number of tickets for the fan club presale and explains why management has reclaimed the tickets originally set aside for ETS and American Express and why the fan club reserved seats are located in less desirable sections than on previous tours. Because U2 management failed to reserve a decent supply of tickets for the fan club, they actually helped brokers steal tickets from Ticketmaster by giving the brokers a greater supply of tickets from which to steal.

In his investigation, Attorney General Elliot Spitzer was able to obtain computer records pinpointing exactly when and which Ticketmaster outlets printed tickets ahead of published sales times. We hope that U2’s lawyers are demanding similar computer records from Ticketmaster to stop the brokers. We also hope that U2’s management will allocate a better supply of tickets for fan club presales in the future so that tickets can get in the right hands.

48 thoughts on “No tickets? Blame U2 management, says promoter

  1. Grrrr…….I knew it was a bit of a mess, but this is worse than I thought. What a disappointment. Nothing happens by accident, that’s for sure. It’s bad form to sell such pricey stuff in a negligent manner. It’s taking consumers for granted. Someone hasn’t been doing their job properly. I’m sure U2 staff are paid more than enough to make sure mistakes llike this don’t happen. It’s not professional. And it doesn’t help that the tickets are expensive to begin with. Bad, bad, bad..
    My dublin presale tickets are nosebleeds. Bad seats. So much for the ‘better seats’ promise. Fans have been treated very shabbily in my opinion.

  2. Grrrr…….I knew it was a bit of a mess, but this is worse than I thought. What a disappointment. Nothing happens by accident, that’s for sure. It’s bad form to sell such pricey stuff in a negligent manner. It’s taking consumers for granted. Someone hasn’t been doing their job properly. I’m sure U2 staff are paid more than enough to make sure mistakes llike this don’t happen. It’s not professional. And it doesn’t help that the tickets are expensive to begin with. Bad, bad, bad..
    My dublin presale tickets are nosebleeds. Bad seats. So much for the ‘better seats’ promise. Fans have been treated very shabbily in my opinion.

  3. It feels weird to type this, but U2 is a business. I always understood that, at least to a degree, but now they seem like a business, nothing more and nothing less. As long as they push product (via overpriced tickets, tie-ins with Apple’s iPods, etc) they’re satisfied. It happens to most popular music acts after a while–think of the Rolling Stones, Elton John, etc (Bruce Springsteen is a notable exception)–and it looks like it’s set in with U2 now.

    I’ve been a fan for close to 20 years, and I’ve never felt as insignificant to the band as I have in the last week. There’s clearly no room for me in the U2 business plan. This saddens me, as these men and their music has had a profound impact on my worldview and my life, but perhaps it’s time for me to move on in some way. Not “hate the band” or burn my CDs or anything like that, but acknowledge them for what they are: U2, Inc.

  4. It feels weird to type this, but U2 is a business. I always understood that, at least to a degree, but now they seem like a business, nothing more and nothing less. As long as they push product (via overpriced tickets, tie-ins with Apple’s iPods, etc) they’re satisfied. It happens to most popular music acts after a while–think of the Rolling Stones, Elton John, etc (Bruce Springsteen is a notable exception)–and it looks like it’s set in with U2 now.

    I’ve been a fan for close to 20 years, and I’ve never felt as insignificant to the band as I have in the last week. There’s clearly no room for me in the U2 business plan. This saddens me, as these men and their music has had a profound impact on my worldview and my life, but perhaps it’s time for me to move on in some way. Not “hate the band” or burn my CDs or anything like that, but acknowledge them for what they are: U2, Inc.

  5. Every business needs regular clients, right? Every business has loyalty programmes for regular clients, or pampers them with special offers, gifts, discounts. Or at least they acknowledge the fact that there are regular clients and that their loyalty is appreciated. And that everything will be done to keep them as a client. I never heard of a business that charges $40 for their ‘loyaltyprogramme’, messes up their ‘special offer’ and then…nothing. No apologie, no explanation, nada. Clearly, U2 is not very good at being a business, or they hired the wrong people to take care of business for them.

  6. Every business needs regular clients, right? Every business has loyalty programmes for regular clients, or pampers them with special offers, gifts, discounts. Or at least they acknowledge the fact that there are regular clients and that their loyalty is appreciated. And that everything will be done to keep them as a client. I never heard of a business that charges $40 for their ‘loyaltyprogramme’, messes up their ‘special offer’ and then…nothing. No apologie, no explanation, nada. Clearly, U2 is not very good at being a business, or they hired the wrong people to take care of business for them.

  7. I can see how that one happened.

    PM 1: “Hey, shouldn’t we be putting tickets aside for the fanclub?”

    PM 2: “Nah, those are sold via the website. I’m sure the u2.com kids will take care of it.”

    U2.com kids: “Pass the pipe there, dude.”

    Fans: “Aaargh. That’s it, I’m selling my rare 7″ collection on eBay.”

  8. I can see how that one happened.

    PM 1: “Hey, shouldn’t we be putting tickets aside for the fanclub?”

    PM 2: “Nah, those are sold via the website. I’m sure the u2.com kids will take care of it.”

    U2.com kids: “Pass the pipe there, dude.”

    Fans: “Aaargh. That’s it, I’m selling my rare 7″ collection on eBay.”

  9. Let me first say that at the end of the day, U2 should be ultimately responsible for what has happened. However, it makes me want to puke how ClearChannel (aka pansies) and Ticketmaster (worst system ever) want to immediately point the finger instead of recognizing faults among their own organizations. Ticketmaster flat out admits that their system is crappy enough to allow people access to tickets before they are actually on sale, then proceeds to say it’s U2’s fault that tickets were “stolen”. How bout fixing that particular problem at the root. I’m like many who have had problems with Ticketmaster in the past. Every single event that has a bit of demand causes huge problems for their system. Is this what we pay that sweet service fee for, to get timeouts and errors? ClearChannel has a nice monopoly, but the spine of a noodle. They wouldn’t admit fault for ANYTHING they are associated with. It’s a wonder they got so big with the way they sell people down the river so much. I was waiting for this situation to turn into this, I was just wondering who would be the first to point the finger. It would really be a breath of fresh air to see organizations step up and apologize for once. Am I alone here, or wouldn’t everyone like to see all three parties involved here take collective responsibility? Shame on all for allowing the chance to make an extra buck alienate so many fans.

  10. Let me first say that at the end of the day, U2 should be ultimately responsible for what has happened. However, it makes me want to puke how ClearChannel (aka pansies) and Ticketmaster (worst system ever) want to immediately point the finger instead of recognizing faults among their own organizations. Ticketmaster flat out admits that their system is crappy enough to allow people access to tickets before they are actually on sale, then proceeds to say it’s U2’s fault that tickets were “stolen”. How bout fixing that particular problem at the root. I’m like many who have had problems with Ticketmaster in the past. Every single event that has a bit of demand causes huge problems for their system. Is this what we pay that sweet service fee for, to get timeouts and errors? ClearChannel has a nice monopoly, but the spine of a noodle. They wouldn’t admit fault for ANYTHING they are associated with. It’s a wonder they got so big with the way they sell people down the river so much. I was waiting for this situation to turn into this, I was just wondering who would be the first to point the finger. It would really be a breath of fresh air to see organizations step up and apologize for once. Am I alone here, or wouldn’t everyone like to see all three parties involved here take collective responsibility? Shame on all for allowing the chance to make an extra buck alienate so many fans.

  11. Dave Matthews Band’s management went to Ticketmaster and negotiated special allotments for all of their shows, that is why they can reserve more tickets for their fan club members to purchase.

    There is absolutely NO way to sell and/or print a Ticketmaster ticket through any point of purchase without the event being on sale first.

  12. Dave Matthews Band’s management went to Ticketmaster and negotiated special allotments for all of their shows, that is why they can reserve more tickets for their fan club members to purchase.

    There is absolutely NO way to sell and/or print a Ticketmaster ticket through any point of purchase without the event being on sale first.

  13. I just went to a broker page after still not getting tickets here in the NYC area…
    Just one broker page I went to, I counted OVER 200 GA tickets being sold for just the 5/18 Meadowlands show!!!!!!!!! I counted OVER 80 GA tickets being sold for the MSG show!!!
    Here’s the link:
    http://www.eventinventory.com/search/results.cfm?restart=yes&client=3230&e=892&v=386&s=1&month=5&day=18&year=2005&p=241992

    i stopped looking because I got just… just…
    just… soooooo verrryy angry!!!!!!!!
    I just wanted 2 GA’s to any of the NYC area shows from the PreSale.
    But, NOPE.
    Nothing for me. Not even this supposed e-mail people are now getting from ticketmaster.
    Nope.

    RossMan (still ticketless)

  14. I just went to a broker page after still not getting tickets here in the NYC area…
    Just one broker page I went to, I counted OVER 200 GA tickets being sold for just the 5/18 Meadowlands show!!!!!!!!! I counted OVER 80 GA tickets being sold for the MSG show!!!
    Here’s the link:
    http://www.eventinventory.com/search/results.cfm?restart=yes&client=3230&e=892&v=386&s=1&month=5&day=18&year=2005&p=241992

    i stopped looking because I got just… just…
    just… soooooo verrryy angry!!!!!!!!
    I just wanted 2 GA’s to any of the NYC area shows from the PreSale.
    But, NOPE.
    Nothing for me. Not even this supposed e-mail people are now getting from ticketmaster.
    Nope.

    RossMan (still ticketless)

  15. bonorules: “There is absolutely NO way to sell and/or print a Ticketmaster ticket through any point of purchase without the event being on sale first.”

    The story didn’t say it was a point-of-purchase machine. It said the tickets can be printed from a “Ticketmaster computer terminal in an arena box office, a promoter’s box office, or ticket outlet.” We’re talking about machines available only to Ticketmaster and Clearchannel employees — not those available to the public in places like record stores.

  16. bonorules: “There is absolutely NO way to sell and/or print a Ticketmaster ticket through any point of purchase without the event being on sale first.”

    The story didn’t say it was a point-of-purchase machine. It said the tickets can be printed from a “Ticketmaster computer terminal in an arena box office, a promoter’s box office, or ticket outlet.” We’re talking about machines available only to Ticketmaster and Clearchannel employees — not those available to the public in places like record stores.

  17. There really is a simple solution to the whole problem, but one that won’t work because of the fickleness of people and their lack of common sense because of the overiding desire to see an event – DON’T PATRONIZE TICKET BROKERS!!! If no one paid outrageous prices from brokers and other scalpers, there would be no market and they would not be in business! Plain and simple! And to bonorules – a co-worker of mine stated his wife worked for Ticketmaster years ago and the lifting of tickets before public sale does happen in the manner outlined in the report. I had actually secured four good reserved seats today, only to have an “internal system error” occur before the transaction was completed. Hmmm…….

  18. There really is a simple solution to the whole problem, but one that won’t work because of the fickleness of people and their lack of common sense because of the overiding desire to see an event – DON’T PATRONIZE TICKET BROKERS!!! If no one paid outrageous prices from brokers and other scalpers, there would be no market and they would not be in business! Plain and simple! And to bonorules – a co-worker of mine stated his wife worked for Ticketmaster years ago and the lifting of tickets before public sale does happen in the manner outlined in the report. I had actually secured four good reserved seats today, only to have an “internal system error” occur before the transaction was completed. Hmmm…….

  19. If U2 did not set aside enough tickets for fans in good locations during the presale, then how is it that scalpers were able to get upwards of 300 tickets each, especially in GA, during the presale?

    The issue is not blaming U2 for forgetting to set aside tickets for fans. Anyone who actually believes U2 capable of not caring about their fans has either not followed U2 closely enough, met any of the band members, is only able to allocate blame on faces, not ideas, corporations or faceless jerks, or just likes the controversy of blaming them.

    The problem is too many scalpers were able to purchase fan club memberships the night before the presale as indicated by both scalpers and u2.com alike. Is this U2’s fault? Indirectly for having a fan club that was not technologically advanced enough to alert anyone to a single person obtaining 100+ memberships, yes, otherwise, no.

    No one made such a fuss in 2001 when the Elevation presale stunk (aside from an open letter or two on sites such as @u2.com). But, then again, most fans already had tickets via Propaganda.

    As far as I am concerned, the only crime U2 committed was to allow the direct ticketing to fans via Propaganda fall by the wayside and become a sterile, internet-based fan club, wherein fans can only get their tickets through a Ticketmaster presale. And I do not think they did this for greed or out of maliciousness or lack of care towards their fans. I think they did this for reasons they felt were completely sound, like being able to reach more fans through the internet, or the more environmental-friendly aspect of a website versus a paper magazine.

    Am I trying to convince you to not blame U2 and remain a fan? No. I’m simply voicing my opinion in this matter based on my own personal thoughts, as well as information I have received from employees of both U2 and u2.com. If you want to blame U2, hate U2, turn your backs on U2, and not go to the show, well good then, more U2 for me!

  20. If U2 did not set aside enough tickets for fans in good locations during the presale, then how is it that scalpers were able to get upwards of 300 tickets each, especially in GA, during the presale?

    The issue is not blaming U2 for forgetting to set aside tickets for fans. Anyone who actually believes U2 capable of not caring about their fans has either not followed U2 closely enough, met any of the band members, is only able to allocate blame on faces, not ideas, corporations or faceless jerks, or just likes the controversy of blaming them.

    The problem is too many scalpers were able to purchase fan club memberships the night before the presale as indicated by both scalpers and u2.com alike. Is this U2’s fault? Indirectly for having a fan club that was not technologically advanced enough to alert anyone to a single person obtaining 100+ memberships, yes, otherwise, no.

    No one made such a fuss in 2001 when the Elevation presale stunk (aside from an open letter or two on sites such as @u2.com). But, then again, most fans already had tickets via Propaganda.

    As far as I am concerned, the only crime U2 committed was to allow the direct ticketing to fans via Propaganda fall by the wayside and become a sterile, internet-based fan club, wherein fans can only get their tickets through a Ticketmaster presale. And I do not think they did this for greed or out of maliciousness or lack of care towards their fans. I think they did this for reasons they felt were completely sound, like being able to reach more fans through the internet, or the more environmental-friendly aspect of a website versus a paper magazine.

    Am I trying to convince you to not blame U2 and remain a fan? No. I’m simply voicing my opinion in this matter based on my own personal thoughts, as well as information I have received from employees of both U2 and u2.com. If you want to blame U2, hate U2, turn your backs on U2, and not go to the show, well good then, more U2 for me!

  21. mel: “If U2 did not set aside enough tickets for fans in good locations during the presale, then how is it that scalpers were able to get upwards of 300 tickets each, especially in GA, during the presale?”

    No one suggested that the brokers obtained tickets from the presale. Although it’s possible brokers bought memberships and tried to get tickets like the rest of us, it’s more likely that they didn’t and instead paid bribes (not membership fees) to get the tickets. In other words, the brokers likely had the tickets *before* the presale.

  22. mel: “If U2 did not set aside enough tickets for fans in good locations during the presale, then how is it that scalpers were able to get upwards of 300 tickets each, especially in GA, during the presale?”

    No one suggested that the brokers obtained tickets from the presale. Although it’s possible brokers bought memberships and tried to get tickets like the rest of us, it’s more likely that they didn’t and instead paid bribes (not membership fees) to get the tickets. In other words, the brokers likely had the tickets *before* the presale.

  23. Cindy: I have read the enormous report on Ticketmaster and paid bribes by ticket brokers. I am fully aware of that. However, I also have read several accounts of scalpers who admitted to purchasing hundreds of memberships just to partake in the presale. I also know someone who works for Absolute Tickets in Los Angeles, CA. The employee of that company told me point blank that his boss had obtained fan club memberships in bulk. I’m not suggesting it. I’m telling you it happened.

  24. Cindy: I have read the enormous report on Ticketmaster and paid bribes by ticket brokers. I am fully aware of that. However, I also have read several accounts of scalpers who admitted to purchasing hundreds of memberships just to partake in the presale. I also know someone who works for Absolute Tickets in Los Angeles, CA. The employee of that company told me point blank that his boss had obtained fan club memberships in bulk. I’m not suggesting it. I’m telling you it happened.

  25. I can’t believe bands like U2 and others don’t try harder to stop the scalpers and brokers from doing this… I’ve checked a few sites for tickets, and as a number of you have mentioned, there are tons of tickets for sale, and they are asking an insane amount fo most of them… saw some being offered for the MSG show, section 106, near the stage for over $2300 US.

    These guys are making more from this, collectively, than the band!!!

  26. I can’t believe bands like U2 and others don’t try harder to stop the scalpers and brokers from doing this… I’ve checked a few sites for tickets, and as a number of you have mentioned, there are tons of tickets for sale, and they are asking an insane amount fo most of them… saw some being offered for the MSG show, section 106, near the stage for over $2300 US.

    These guys are making more from this, collectively, than the band!!!

  27. U2 Concert Ticket Buying Experience = Disaster

    U2log.com // No tickets? Blame U2 management, says promoter // 2005-01-31 Who’s to blame for the U2 fan club presale debacle? A Clearchannel representative points the finger squarely at U2’s management. Wow. Everything I’ve read so far seems to ind…

  28. U2 Concert Ticket Buying Experience = Disaster

    U2log.com // No tickets? Blame U2 management, says promoter // 2005-01-31 Who’s to blame for the U2 fan club presale debacle? A Clearchannel representative points the finger squarely at U2’s management. Wow. Everything I’ve read so far seems to ind…

  29. after all is said and done I am left with really bad and expensive tickets… and feel totally scammed by everyone involved… I really like the band.. liked them forever it seems… but this is really bad, and maybe i should reconsider.. maybe we are all saps believing words rather than actions.. money talks it seems. The article above was really an eye opener for me. The least the band should do is to give us free good ticket to all of us who got screwed!…. yeah, dream on….. In any case I am sending them a hand written letter to their Dublin address…

  30. after all is said and done I am left with really bad and expensive tickets… and feel totally scammed by everyone involved… I really like the band.. liked them forever it seems… but this is really bad, and maybe i should reconsider.. maybe we are all saps believing words rather than actions.. money talks it seems. The article above was really an eye opener for me. The least the band should do is to give us free good ticket to all of us who got screwed!…. yeah, dream on….. In any case I am sending them a hand written letter to their Dublin address…

  31. I think we’re all overlooking the REAL root of the problem:

    Propaganda WAS a fanclub; U2.com memberships are NOT. I can buy a membership to 100’s of websites (CNN.com for example) that will give me “exclusive” access to certain content, but it doesn’t necessarily make me a FAN (I wouldn’t consider myself a member of the CNN fanclub).

    Propaganda gave us hard, hold in your hand, collectible perks that FANs enjoy. U2.com memberships give you electronic, stare at your screen, web quality content.

    Beyond all of this, to switch formats from Propaganda to U2.com membership only weeks before the “presale” was an open invitation to scalpers, in my opinion. At least with propaganda those scalpers that bought bulk U2.com memberships would have recieved a bulk amount of magazines 4 times a year to remind them of their dirty deeds. But now they just avoid U2.com for the rest of their lives (or until the next “presale”) and don’t ever have to think about it again.

  32. I think we’re all overlooking the REAL root of the problem:

    Propaganda WAS a fanclub; U2.com memberships are NOT. I can buy a membership to 100’s of websites (CNN.com for example) that will give me “exclusive” access to certain content, but it doesn’t necessarily make me a FAN (I wouldn’t consider myself a member of the CNN fanclub).

    Propaganda gave us hard, hold in your hand, collectible perks that FANs enjoy. U2.com memberships give you electronic, stare at your screen, web quality content.

    Beyond all of this, to switch formats from Propaganda to U2.com membership only weeks before the “presale” was an open invitation to scalpers, in my opinion. At least with propaganda those scalpers that bought bulk U2.com memberships would have recieved a bulk amount of magazines 4 times a year to remind them of their dirty deeds. But now they just avoid U2.com for the rest of their lives (or until the next “presale”) and don’t ever have to think about it again.

  33. I have been reading many of the comments here, and I agree with most fans’ assesment of the problem. What I find hard to believe is that the band and its management didn’t foresee that this would happen(the brokers and scalpers gaining even more access through the presale). I also sent a letter to reps at U2.com to complain about the small number of shows that the band is doing in the NYC area, which is where I live. A five or six show run(at least) at the Garden should have been considered. In years past, for example, Bruce Springsteen would just keep adding shows until he knew that his fans were satisfied. Plus, the abundance of tix kept the prices lower, and brokers and scalpers still made money.

  34. I have been reading many of the comments here, and I agree with most fans’ assesment of the problem. What I find hard to believe is that the band and its management didn’t foresee that this would happen(the brokers and scalpers gaining even more access through the presale). I also sent a letter to reps at U2.com to complain about the small number of shows that the band is doing in the NYC area, which is where I live. A five or six show run(at least) at the Garden should have been considered. In years past, for example, Bruce Springsteen would just keep adding shows until he knew that his fans were satisfied. Plus, the abundance of tix kept the prices lower, and brokers and scalpers still made money.

  35. WAKE UP! Blame the real root of the problem (management). There’s no doubt that u2 cares about its fans , but the management`s job is to gross the most possible profits for the tour. Brokers provide the band a sellout concert before it goes on sale, the management for the band doesnt want to wait one or two hours for the concert to sellout. Money in the bank is better than money coming in. Ticket brokers will always be the scapegoats for all the ticket shortages in the country. The real problem is that the u2 management finally figured how to make the most buck for their tix. At the same time they defrauded honest fans of their hard earned money by selling them a u2 membership, and then in return the fans that did get tickets got them with a “obstructed view” label. Bottom line, this ticket business is way beyond economic science, and every major band and sports association is doing it. This Country was build on supply and demand “Its the American Way” .

  36. WAKE UP! Blame the real root of the problem (management). There’s no doubt that u2 cares about its fans , but the management`s job is to gross the most possible profits for the tour. Brokers provide the band a sellout concert before it goes on sale, the management for the band doesnt want to wait one or two hours for the concert to sellout. Money in the bank is better than money coming in. Ticket brokers will always be the scapegoats for all the ticket shortages in the country. The real problem is that the u2 management finally figured how to make the most buck for their tix. At the same time they defrauded honest fans of their hard earned money by selling them a u2 membership, and then in return the fans that did get tickets got them with a “obstructed view” label. Bottom line, this ticket business is way beyond economic science, and every major band and sports association is doing it. This Country was build on supply and demand “Its the American Way” .

  37. To Christheedge: I get what you’re saying about bands like Springsteen adding shows as others sell out. One thing to consider is that U2 is playing in, predominantly, basketball and hockey arenas, where the post-seasons regularly run into May and June, limiting the availability of those arenas. Even though the NHL is on strike, teams still have dates booked at those arenas and said arenas must honor those contracts. I was shocked that the Los Angeles area got four shows on this tour and New York only three (Irish been going there for years…acting like they own the place :))

    I’ve always wondered what it would be like to sit kitty-corner behind a stage and pay $105 for the privilage. Although, I do feel lucky that I even got tickets at all. It would be nice if U2 were to run their own ticketing operation. Here in LA, the Los Angeles Dodgers run their own ticket system…no Ticketmaster problems and the fees are generally $3 or less, quite unlike Ticketmaster (I bought tickets to a Clippers basketball game. My seat cost $10 but after service charges, I paid almost $18…), which has crashed EVERYTIME I have tried to buy tickets during the first day of an on-sale.

  38. To Christheedge: I get what you’re saying about bands like Springsteen adding shows as others sell out. One thing to consider is that U2 is playing in, predominantly, basketball and hockey arenas, where the post-seasons regularly run into May and June, limiting the availability of those arenas. Even though the NHL is on strike, teams still have dates booked at those arenas and said arenas must honor those contracts. I was shocked that the Los Angeles area got four shows on this tour and New York only three (Irish been going there for years…acting like they own the place :))

    I’ve always wondered what it would be like to sit kitty-corner behind a stage and pay $105 for the privilage. Although, I do feel lucky that I even got tickets at all. It would be nice if U2 were to run their own ticketing operation. Here in LA, the Los Angeles Dodgers run their own ticket system…no Ticketmaster problems and the fees are generally $3 or less, quite unlike Ticketmaster (I bought tickets to a Clippers basketball game. My seat cost $10 but after service charges, I paid almost $18…), which has crashed EVERYTIME I have tried to buy tickets during the first day of an on-sale.

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